Friday, 19 April 2019 | 14:21 WIB

Boeing Makes Managerial Reshuffle to Address 737 MAX Crisis

Boeing Conducts Managerial Reshuffle to Address 737 MAX Crisis (thecolumbian)

SEATTLE, NETRALNEWS.COM -- The commercial part of aircraft company Boeing Co is facing the biggest crisis in years after a deadly accident involving 737 MAX aircraft, an event that mandated the deputy chief technical officer on new temporary executive duties to conduct an investigation, as stated in the company email on Tuesday (19 / 3/2019).

Management reshuffle was carried out after Canada and Europe said they would seek their own safety guarantees for the Boeing 737 MAX, another more complicated plan to make the aircraft fly around the world after the planes were stopped due to accidents that killed more than 300 people.

John Hamilton, a former vice president and chief technical officer of the commercial airplane division, will focus more on his role as chief engineer, said chief executive Kevin McAllister told employees on Tuesday in an email seen by Reuters.

"This will make him devote his full attention to accident investigations," McAllister said, adding that changes in the composition of employees were also needed "as long as we prioritize and also add resources to accident investigations."

Lynne Hopper, who previously headed the testing and evaluation of Boeing's technology and Testing and technology groups, was appointed as vice president of engineering, McAllister said.

A Boeing spokesman declined to comment but acknowledged that the email was genuine.

The reshuffle showed that the world's largest aircraft maker freed technical sources while facing surveillance of accident investigations while also maintaining the production of slim-bodied 737 aircraft which were spinners of its money.

Previously Hamilton served as vice chairman of commercial aircraft engineering at Boeing from April 2016 to March 2019, according to his biography listed on the Boeing website.

From July 2013 to March 2016, Hamilton served as deputy chairman of security, safety and fulfillment as well as supervising the authorization of drafting commercial aircraft, a program that specifically handles safety certification tasks representing the Federal Aviation Administration of the United States.

Safety experts and lawmakers question how regulators learn the full type of MAX and how pilots are trained to handle new features.

At present all world regulators have a MAX fleet of more than 300 aircraft and shipments of more than 5,000 units, worth more than US $ 500 billion, are suspended.

Boeing rose 0.3 percent on Tuesday, closing at 373.43 dollars. The position is still down more than 11 percent since the accident in Ethiopia, wiping out more than 25 billion dollars in its stock market.